THE POST-APARTHEID XENOPHOBIC ATTACKS IN SOUTH AFRICA: A REFLECTION ON GOVERNMENT INTERFERENCES

Anuoluwapo A Durokifa, E.O.C. Ijeoma

Abstract


South Africa has witnessed series of xenophobic violence since the end of apartheid in 1994. The reoccurrence of these attacks has raised concerns in many quarters as to whether the Government has done enough to stop the attacks. Using a desktop methodology, the study unpacked Government response to the xenophobic attacks and tried to establish the various factors that may have contributed to xenophobic sentiments. The paper argues that the initiatives implemented by the Government not be effective in curbing the attack. It further argues that the South African Government may have indirectly contributed to the reoccurrence of these attacks on foreigners. The paper asserts that combatting xenophobic violence is more than merely altering or implementing a policy but requires addressing the fundamental basis that triggers conflict on which citizens lay their claim

Keywords


South Africa; Xenophobia; Racism; Post-Apartheid; Immigrants.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11564/31-1-981

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